NCDC
MEETING AGENDA
MONDAY, APRIL 21, 2014
02:00 P.M. COUNCIL CHAMBERS

If you have an opinion about any of the demolitions, the NCDC members want to hear about it! 

CLICK HERE to email the Neighborhood Conservation District Committee (NCDC) and share your thoughts. If this link does not work for you, right click on “click here,” copy the email addresses, and paste the email addresses into the “to” field of an email.

How else can you help? CLICK HERE to learn more about the citizen’s role in the demolition review process.

AGENDA (Not listed in order)

d) 3200 St. Bernard Ave.

- The former Housing Mart (Pictured above)

Henry Grimball was the principal architect for the structure.
‘Grimball said the housing mart building, now under construction, will reflect architectural characteristics of New Orleans, such as balconies, exterior stairways and wide roof overhangs.” He was a modernist and  preservationist - ”unalterably opposed” to the Riverfront Expressway. Grimball was associated with Louisiana Landmarks, served as the VCC architectural committee chairman, and was architect for the restoration planning of the Olivier House. He was honored by the regional AIA for his deisgn of the Marina. Grimball designed Mildred Osborne Elementary at 6701 Curran, which has since been demolished.  He was the architect of new construction at Jackson Barracks in 1977 and designed UNO Library 1979. (Thanks to Francine Stock for the research!)

  Application:  3200 St. Bernard Ave.  14-05990-Demo

a) 305-07 Octavia St.

Application:  305-07OctaviaSt14-06089-DEMO

VI. New Business – Applications (APP)

 

a) 1311 Webster St.

  Application:  1311 Webster St. 14-09725-Demo pt1


b) 2318-20 S. Prieur St.

  Application:  2318-20 S. Prieur 14-10300-Demo

c) 1928-30 7Th St.

  Application:  1928-30 7th St. 14-10300-Demo

e) 628 S. Lopez St.

  Application:  628 S.Lopez St 14-05990-Demo

APP – Owner/Contractor Application

IDC – Imminent Danger of Collapse – Owner did not request demolition

SD – Strategic Demolition – Owner did not request demolition FEMA – FEMA-Sponsored Demolition – Owner did not request demolition NCDC 4/14/2014 1 of 2

Comments (0)

Neighborhood Conservation District Committee
MEETING AGENDA
MONDAY, April 7, 2014
02:00 P.M. COUNCIL CHAMBERS

If you have an opinion about any of the demolitions, the NCDC members want to hear about it! 

CLICK HERE to email the Neighborhood Conservation District Committee (NCDC) and share your thoughts. If this link does not work for you, right click on “click here,” copy the email addresses, and paste the email addresses into the “to” field of an email.

How else can you help? CLICK HERE to learn more about the citizen’s role in the demolition review process.

AGENDA
& PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE 2:00 p.m. City Council Chamber City Hall – Civic Center 1300 Perdido Street, 1st Floor New Orleans, Louisiana, 70112

  Old Business

 

  2322 3rd St.

Application:  2322 3rd St.pt1-14-03814-demo

  2233 Conti St.

 Application:  2233 Conti St.-14-03965-demo

  3915-17 Banks St.

Note: This proposed demolition was previously denied by NCDC.

 Application:  3915-17 Banks St.pt1-14-04267-demo

  404 N. Miro St.

 Application:  404 N. Miro St.-14-04140-demo

  2414 Spain St.

 Application:  2414 Spain St.pt1-14-04693-demo

  2900 S. Claiborne Ave.

 Application:  2900 S. Claiborne Ave.-14-02437-demo

  2340 Caffin Ave.

 Application:  2340 Caffin Ave.pt1-14-05097-demo

  4218 Banks St.

 Application:  4218 Banks St.pt1-14-05603-demo

  2314 Spain St.

 Application:  2314 Spain St.pt1-14-05832-demo

  4000 Canal St.

 Application:  4000 Canal St..-14-05866-demo

  305-07 Octavia St.

 Application:  305-07 Octavia St.pt1-14-06089-demo

  5409 Tchoupitoulas St.

 Application:  5409 Tchoupitoulas St.pt1-14-06218-demo

  1001 Webster St.

 Application:  1001 Webster St.pt1-14-06390-demo

  1420 Alabo St.

 Application:  1420 ALABO ST.

  1421 Benton St.

 Application:  1421 BENTON ST.

  2415 Dryades St.

  Application:  2415 DRYADES ST.

  1421 Flood St.

 Application:  1421 FLOOD ST.

  1908-10 Frenchman St.

  Application:  1908-10 FRENCHMAN ST.

  3201 Gen. Taylor St.

  Application:  3201 GEN TAYLOR

  527-29 S. Hennessey St.

  Application:  527-29 S. HENNESSEY ST.

  3836 Metropolitan St.

  Application:  3836 METROPOLITIAN ST.

  1931-33 Pauline St.

  Application:  1931-33 PAULINE ST.

  2328 St. Anthony St.

  Application:  2328 ST. ANTHONY ST.

  2226 St. Maurice St.

  Application:  2226 ST. MAURICE ST.

  3904-06 Second St.

  Application:  3604-06 2ND ST.

  1629 Alabo St.

  Application:  1629 ALABO ST.

  2236-38 Annette St.

  Application:  2236-38 ANNETTE ST.

  1426 Baronne St.

  Application:  1426 BARONNE ST.

  1309 Caffin Ave.

  Application:  1309 CAFFIN AVE.

  1938 Caffin Ave.

 Application:   1938 CAFFIN AVE.

  1610 Clouet St.

  Application:  1610 CLOUET ST.

  3404-06 Delachaise St.

 Application:  3404-06 DELACHAISE ST.

  2934-36 Eagle St.

  Application:  2934-36 EAGLE ST ..8814 FIG ST.

  1726 Feliciana St.

 Application:  1726 FELICIANA ST

  1341-43 Flood St.

 Application:  1341-43 FLOOD ST.

1904-06 Frenchmen St.

  Application:  1904-06 FRENCHMEN ST.

  1435 Galllier St.

 Application:  1435 GALLIER ST.

  412-14 N. Miro St.

  Application:  412-14 N. MIRO ST.

  2922-24 Monroe St.

  Application:  2922-30 MONROE ST.

  2127-29 Montegut St.

 Application:  2127-29 MONTEGUT ST.

  1405-07 Music St.

  Application:  1405-17 MUSIC ST.

  6727-29 Valjean St.

 Application:  6727-29 VALJEAN ST.

  3429 Willow St.

  Application:  3429 WILLOW ST.

VI. New Business – Applications (APP)

 

  1410 Bodenger Blvd.

Application:  1410 Bodgenger Blvd

  1504 Bodenger Blvd.

Application:  1504 Bodgenger Blvd.

  1404 Bodenger Blvd.

Application:  1404 Bodgenger Blvd

  8824 Fig St.

Application:  8824 Fig St.

  1706 Tchoupitoulas St.

Application:  1706 Tchoupitoulas St

  219-21 S. Rocheblave

Application:  219-21 S. Rocheblave St

  2145-47 N. Tonti St.

Application:  2145-47 N. Tonti St.

  2024 Bartholomew St.

Application:  2024 Bartholomew St.

  2021 Tricou St.

Application:  2021 Tricou St

  1213 S. Telemachus St.

Application:  1213 S. Telemachus St

  4315 Marais St.

Application:  4315 Marais St

 

  New Business – Strategic Demolition (Office of Code Enforcement) (SD)
  2233-35 Harmony St.

 

  New Business – FEMA-Sponsored (Office of Code Enforcement) (FEMA)
Adjournment This meeting may result in the listed property being demolished. This will be the public’s opportunity to state their position. Anyone having an interest in these matters is urged to attend this meeting or send a representative. This meeting is accessible to people with disabilities.  Requests for additional accommodations or any assistance to participate may be directed to the Office of Public Advocacy at 504-658-4015 (voice), 504-658-4002 (facsimile), or the City’s TTY 504-586-4475.  This communiqué is available in alternative formats upon request. Jared E. Munster Mitchell J. Landrieu Director of Safety and Permits Mayor

APP – Owner/Contractor Application

IDC – Imminent Danger of Collapse – Owner did not request demolition

SD – Strategic Demolition – Owner did not request demolition FEMA – FEMA-Sponsored Demolition – Owner did not request demolition NCDC 11/4/2013 2 of 2

Comments (0)

Neighborhood Conservation District Committee
MEETING AGENDA
MONDAY, MARCH 17, 2014
02:00 P.M. COUNCIL CHAMBERS

If you have an opinion about any of the demolitions, the NCDC members want to hear about it! 

CLICK HERE to email the Neighborhood Conservation District Committee (NCDC) and share your thoughts. If this link does not work for you, right click on “click here,” copy the email addresses, and paste the email addresses into the “to” field of an email.

How else can you help? CLICK HERE to learn more about the citizen’s role in the demolition review process.

AGENDA
& PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE 2:00 p.m. City Council Chamber City Hall – Civic Center 1300 Perdido Street, 1st Floor New Orleans, Louisiana, 70112

VI. New Business – Applications (APP)

 

a) 2322 3rd St.

Application:  2322 3rd St.pt1-14-03814-demo

b) 2233 Conti St.

 Application:  2233 Conti St.-14-03965-demo

c) 3915-17 Banks St.

Note: This proposed demolition was previously denied by NCDC.

 Application:  3915-17 Banks St.pt1-14-04267-demo

d) 404 N. Miro St.

 Application:  404 N. Miro St.-14-04140-demo

e) 2414 Spain St.

 Application:  2414 Spain St.pt1-14-04693-demo

f) 2900 S. Claiborne Ave.

 Application:  2900 S. Claiborne Ave.-14-02437-demo

g) 2340 Caffin Ave.

 Application:  2340 Caffin Ave.pt1-14-05097-demo

h) 4218 Banks St.

 Application:  4218 Banks St.pt1-14-05603-demo

i) 2314 Spain St.

 Application:  2314 Spain St.pt1-14-05832-demo

j) 4000 Canal St.

 Application:  4000 Canal St..-14-05866-demo

k) 305-07 Octavia St.

 Application:  305-07 Octavia St.pt1-14-06089-demo

l) 5409 Tchoupitoulas St.

 Application:  5409 Tchoupitoulas St.pt1-14-06218-demo

m) 1001 Webster St.

 Application:  1001 Webster St.pt1-14-06390-demo

VII. New Business – Strategic Demolition (Office of Code Enforcement) (SD)

 

a) 1420 Alabo St.

 Application:  1420 ALABO ST.

b) 1421 Benton St.

 Application:  1421 BENTON ST.

c) 2415 Dryades St.

  Application:  2415 DRYADES ST.

d) 1421 Flood St.

 Application:  1421 FLOOD ST.

e) 1908-10 Frenchman St.

  Application:  1908-10 FRENCHMAN ST.

f) 3201 Gen. Taylor St.

  Application:  3201 GEN TAYLOR

g) 527-29 S. Hennessey St.

  Application:  527-29 S. HENNESSEY ST.

h) 3836 Metropolitan St.

  Application:  3836 METROPOLITIAN ST.

i) 1931-33 Pauline St.

  Application:  1931-33 PAULINE ST.

j) 2328 St. Anthony St.

  Application:  2328 ST. ANTHONY ST.

k) 2226 St. Maurice St.

  Application:  2226 ST. MAURICE ST.

l) 3904-06 Second St.

  Application:  3604-06 2ND ST.

m) 1629 Alabo St.

  Application:  1629 ALABO ST.

n) 2236-38 Annette St.

  Application:  2236-38 ANNETTE ST.

o) 1426 Baronne St.

  Application:  1426 BARONNE ST.

p) 1309 Caffin Ave.

  Application:  1309 CAFFIN AVE.

q) 1938 Caffin Ave.

 Application:   1938 CAFFIN AVE.

r) 1610 Clouet St.

  Application:  1610 CLOUET ST.

s) 3404-06 Delachaise St.

 Application:  3404-06 DELACHAISE ST.

t) 2934-36 Eagle St.

  Application:  2934-36 EAGLE ST ..8814 FIG ST.

u) 1726 Feliciana St.

 Application:  1726 FELICIANA ST

v) 1341-43 Flood St.

 Application:  1341-43 FLOOD ST.

w) 1904-06 Frenchmen St.

  Application:  1904-06 FRENCHMEN ST.

x) 1435 Galllier St.

 Application:  1435 GALLIER ST.

y) 412-14 N. Miro St.

  Application:  412-14 N. MIRO ST.

z) 2922-24 Monroe St.

  Application:  2922-30 MONROE ST.

aa) 2127-29 Montegut St.

 Application:  2127-29 MONTEGUT ST.

bb) 1405-07 Music St.

  Application:  1405-17 MUSIC ST.

cc) 6727-29 Valjean St.

 Application:  6727-29 VALJEAN ST.

dd) 3429 Willow St.

  Application:  3429 WILLOW ST.

VIII. New Business – FEMA-Sponsored (Office of Code Enforcement) (FEMA)
IX. Adjournment This meeting may result in the listed property being demolished. This will be the public’s opportunity to state their position. Anyone having an interest in these matters is urged to attend this meeting or send a representative. This meeting is accessible to people with disabilities.  Requests for additional accommodations or any assistance to participate may be directed to the Office of Public Advocacy at 504-658-4015 (voice), 504-658-4002 (facsimile), or the City’s TTY 504-586-4475.  This communiqué is available in alternative formats upon request. Jared E. Munster Mitchell J. Landrieu Director of Safety and Permits Mayor

APP – Owner/Contractor Application

IDC – Imminent Danger of Collapse – Owner did not request demolition

SD – Strategic Demolition – Owner did not request demolition FEMA – FEMA-Sponsored Demolition – Owner did not request demolition NCDC 11/4/2013 2 of 2

Comments (0)

Neighborhood Conservation Districts Committee
WHEN: Feb. 17, 2014 @ 2:00 PM
WHERE: City Council Chambers (1300 Perdido Street)

(Pictured:  1128-30 Constantinople)

If you have an opinion about any of the demolitions, the NCDC members want to hear about it!

CLICK HERE to view to view the agenda and photos. The demolition proposals are listed by neighborhood. Are there any proposals in your area? How do you feel about the demolition?

CLICK HERE to view a map of the proposed demolitions.

We’ve also included a zoomed in map of the properties proposed for demolition at N. Claiborne and Elysian Fields below. Developers are requesting to demolish these properties in order to build a CVS. Click here to view the plans. 

The individual properties involved:

1630 ELYSIAN FIELDS AVE.
1616 ELYSIAN FIELDS AVE.
2127 N. CLAIBORNE AVE.
1600 ELYSIAN FIELDS AVE.
1638 ELYSIAN FIELDS AVE.
1622 ELYSIAN FIELDS AVE.
1626 ELYSIAN FIELDS AVE.

CLICK HERE to email the committee and share your thoughts. If this link does not work for you, right click on “click here,” copy the email addresses, and paste the email addresses into the “to” field of an email.

How else can you help? CLICK HERE to learn more about the citizen’s role in the demolition review process.

Comments (0)

PRC’s urban adventure group Melioristica showed their love of historic architecture by participating in what has become a national Valentine’s Day tradition among preservationists nationwide. It is called “heart bombing” and involves constructing homemade Valentines for your favorite vacant historic buildings. The tradition started in Buffalo, New York and has since spread to cities such as Cleveland, Ohio; St. Paul, Minnesota; and Wheeling, West Virginia. February is even designated as “I love Texas Courthouses” month by the National Trust! The goal of the project according to Bernice Radle of Buffalo’s Young Preservationists, co-organizer of the original event in Buffalo, is to “shine a positive light and help the public understand that there are great buildings out there in need of attention, new ownership and ultimately — a new life.”

For their first year of heart bombing, Melioristica chose vacant buildings in New Orleans that are in various stages of the blight mitigation process– from buildings that are blighted with uncertain futures to ones that are stabilized and about to be renovated. They also encouraged neighborhood groups to heart bomb properties in their neighborhoods that are of particular concern to them.

The ultimate goal is to get people talking about vacant and/or blighted structures in their neighborhoods which will hopefully lead to getting them back into commerce, improving quality of life for residents. In just about every New Orleans neighborhood there are properties that are in bad shape but that have great architectural detail and potential. It is easy to pass by them every day and ignore them and get complacent. Heart bombing is a way to remind the community that these buildings deserve a second chance and can be excellent catalysts for not only aesthetic improvement in their neighborhoods, but can bring jobs to the community as well.

Click here to check out all of our photos from this year’s heart bombing, and to learn more about each building!

                     

Categories : Advocacy, Blight, Education
Comments (1)

You may have heard that the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority (NORA) is holding another property auction on March 28th. We’ll circulate the list of properties once it is made available, likely later this week.

At the same time, NORA is soliciting “expression of interests” for properties in their portfolio; the deadline is Feb. 18th. PRC staff has combed the list of NORA owned structures on the City’s data portal and have grouped photos of the buildings at the link below. The majority of these properties are in Local and/or National Register Historic Districts or in the Neighborhood Conservation District, but you’ll also find 2 or 3 properties either immediately outside districts or in areas where PRC’s Rebuilding Together Program has worked.
Photos can be viewed online HERE. Note: some of our photos are dated, so before you submit an expression of interest or purchase a house at auction, please visit the house!
The complete list of NORA owned properties can be viewed on the  City’s data portal.
.
To submit an expression of interest, visit NORA’s website HERE; again, the deadline to “express interest” is Feb. 18.

Here are the steps:

-verify the address of the NORA Property in which you would like to indicate interest
-complete this online form to express your interest in a NORA owned property.

If PRC staff can be of additional assistance, please email Michelle Kimball HERE.

Categories : Advocacy
Comments (0)
Jan
31

Memories of Mary Fitzpatrick

By · Comments (1)

The February 2014 issue of Preservation in Print is dedicated to our beloved editor, Mary Fitzpatrick, who we tragically lost, much too soon, this past December. Remembrances of Mary’s prolific work as editor of Preservation in Print for 18 years, as an advocate for preservation, as a wonderful person and as a dedicated mother, wife and friend fill the pages. But there were so many memories and loving thoughts that our readers and Mary’s peers and friends sent to PIP that we simply couldn’t fit them all in the magazine! Here are all of the memories in total that we received, and we invite you, in the comments section, to please leave your own.

“Mary Fitzpatrick is a woman that can’t be summed up in a thought or two. What occurred to me as I was leafing through Days and Nights in the Dreamy City is that this book, of the pages and pages she has devoted to the city, is the best sort of love letter to the city. There are dozens, hundreds of facets to this place- how appropriate to tell the city’s story by capturing those facets, because not one person’s perspective can capture a place this dynamic and full of life. And so it is with Mary. I suspect we will try to remember her by consolidating as many little anecdotes as we can, because how else can we properly memorialize a woman as dynamic and full of life as Mary? With that said, one other thing strikes me. We constantly talk about how amazing a place this is, this place we call home. How fortunate we are to live in a place this rich with history and stories. But remembering that Mary’s own story comes with a list of cities in which she and Vaughan had lived, some of the greatest cities in the world, I can’t help but consider us that much more fortunate to live in a place to which Mary devoted so much of her life and time and love. Mary leaves a trove of words dedicated to New Orleans, but the greatest testament is that we had Mary for a time. For a great time, at that!”

-Will Hales, Iberia Bank, PRC board member

 

“Mary was a warm, intelligent woman, and a terrific conversationalist. She was patient, kind and never, raised her voice in anger. Dedicated to preservation and revitalization of New Orleans as expressed through her exquisite writing, photography and editing, Mary has made an enduring, positive difference in New Orleanians’ appreciation of their City.”

-Liz and Poco Sloss, friends

 

“It was an honor to call Mary a sister and a friend.She leaves a legacy of love,grace and generosity.Mary will be greatly missed but will live in our hearts forever.”

-Janie Blackmon, PRC board member

 

“To know Mary was to simply love her. Her passion for life was infectious and radiated through her broad smile and twinkling eyes. Her voice always rose in enthusiasm when discussing the people and projects she loved.  That was her lovely manner, but she was so much more. Her intelligence gave her ability and her sense of purpose and commitment gave her the staying power so that her projects had maximum impact. Mary’s Preservation in Print, yes it was hers,  is simply the finest organ of its kind in the preservation world. The quality of the publication has been the single most important driver of the PRC’s extraordinarily diverse membership spread across this country. Mary’s personal and professional efforts for the PRC, going well beyond Preservation in Print and spanning nearly a generation in time, has added immeasurably to the status and success of the organization. Everyone in New Orleans should be grateful. 
 
On a personal level, we received needed and generous helpings of Mary’s encouragement during difficult restoration projects. Quite literally she boosted our spirits when we needed it the most, urging us, ever so nicely, to reach a little higher and try a lot harder. We miss Mary greatly both because she has made our beloved New Orleans a better place and because she enriched our lives with her kind and giving friendship. “
-Katherine and Tony Gelderman, friends and developers

“Mary Fitzpatrick was a class act. She was calm, elegantly appointed, and interested in others. As a colleague at the PRC, she was supportive, caring, level-headed, and well-respected. In addition to working hard and producing three books and a magazine to much acclaim, she took time to appreciate all aspects of life. I fondly recall seeing her riding her light blue cruiser bicycle through the Lower Garden District (with helmet of course) on her way to work. She seemed to be in-the-moment, focusing on the ride while taking in the sights. Mary will be a greatly missed presence, and her life and her work will continue to inspire me and anyone else who had the privilege of knowing her.”

-Suzanne Blaum, director of Education and Outreach, PRC

“For all of us who made contributions to Mary and Virginia’s beautiful book, it was an honor to have been included. I have given copies to many friends and family and it has been loved by all. Days and Nights in the Dreamy City is a lasting treasure of Mary’s devotion to New Orleans.

Also, I have a personal recent appreciation of Mary’s willingness to reach out and support a worthy preservation project. As a committee member of the Vieux Carre Commission Foundation’s Lighting Study for the French Quarter, I asked Mary to write an article  about it in PIP. She wrote an exemplary article in the May 2013 edition and even chose to have it featured on the cover. It was such wonderful support for a much needed improvement for lighting in the French Quarter.”

-Anne Morse, PRC board member

“Mary’s light-hearted yet grounded approach to writing and photography beautifully reflected the city’s spirit. She left us with treasures.
 Mary was able to guide Preservation in Print and book developmen, editing from afar using wifi at Georgetown cafes during the year she lived in Washington, D.C., and commuted to New Orleans.   Her stay in the mid-Atlantic led her to compare New Orleans’ vernacular shotguns to the emblematic rowhouses in Baltimore and Washington. And during an enviable month-long stay in Italy in April 2007, she didn’t miss a step in editing Preservation in Print as well as bringing forth “New Orleans’ Favorite Shotguns.” 
 -Sue Hobbs, writer
“On a day in May some eighteen years ago I sat down with Mary for a lunch at Galatoire’s arranged by a mutual friend. I didn’t know a thing about Mary; I didn’t know she wrote, or anything about her many other accomplishments. The mutual friend thought we would like each other…she was new in town and so on. Almost immediately I realized I was meeting an exceptional and gifted person. Our conversation ranged over many things that day. One was how guilty and dismal I felt about leaving the editorship of Preservation in Print with no replacement anywhere in sight. When Mary said quietly, Julie I think I would like that job, I could have swung her around in my arms. True, I would have swung a willing hyena around at that point, but this was no random walk-on. This was one of those heavenly-intervention events that would be deemed too trite for good fiction.You could say it was just the right time and the right place, but Mary was very often in the right place at the right time. Like many good writers, she was an exceptionally attentive and thinking listener. She listened to people’s dreams and ideas and distilled the good ones into successful projects. She thought big, but respected the small, crucial details and got them done. She related to younger writers and artists and they greatly benefited from her mentorshipOne of the many things that made Mary so loveable was that she was a serious person who didn’t take herself seriously. Mary radiated good will, a quality that helped her wring dollars from turnips and bend opinion with a quiet passion. Her special gift of intimacy drew everyone she knew into the warm circle of her unique grace.”-Julie McCollam, former editor, Preservation in Print “Two traits that made Mary so memorable were an innate,  unfeigned intellectual curiosity and the ability to convey what she gathered.  Her quest to know was a quality that travelled well, from Galatoire’s to the Sudan and back.  This gift was so natural that it was quickly clear to others in any setting that she wanted to learn without preconception.  Mary  asked good questions and then listened.  The answers and insights she got rewarded her candor, straightforwardness, and the depth of her interest.  Her ability to synthesize and report what she came to know  lives on,  in Preservation in Print, in her other works,  and in those fortunate enough to have known her.  Decartes said, “It is not enough to have a good mind, the main thing is to use it well.”   Mary did.”-Camille Strachan, attorney “Mary lived such a full and rich life, she traveled and lived all over the world but to Mary it wasn’t about the places but the people…Mary loved to engage others and listen to their stories-young or old, Mary had a magical way of connecting to people.”
-Linda Westfeldt, friend

 

“Mary was that ideal editor who communicated her own passion for a subject to the writers she was enlisting for the cause.   She got them to do good work, inquisitive and factual and complete.   It all added up to a persuasiveness of coverage and presentation that moved the public discussion to a more constructive level.  That’s the best kind of advocacy journalism, based on scrupulous accuracy, exploring all the possibilities, reaching a clear new truth.   The impressive body of her work at “Preservation in Print” has moved New Orleans understanding of how to make a better city.  That’s a huge contribution.  It will be remembered and appreciated.”

 -Jack Davis, publisher and editor

 

 

“Mary was one of the first people outside of my family to believe in my artistic ability. She discovered my work at the Dark Room and I can remember the call like yesterday. She was so enthusiastic, “Stirling, I just have to have your work for the cover of this book I am working on! It’s called New Orleans Favorite Shotguns.” Looking back on that period of time when I was high school, I know realize that Mary was a major force in shaping who I am today. Her support, vision and constant positivity will never be forgotten and neither will she. Thank you Mary for touching my life, you will forever be missed. “

-Stirling Barrett, artist

 

 

“Mary took a small kitchen table  publication, known as Preservation Press back in 1974, and grew it into a glossy nationally recognized award winning magazine devoted to the architecture of New Orleans and Louisiana. Mary loved the quirky and obscure elements,places, and people  that make New Orleans such a special city. She captured this in her writing, teaching readers what it is that makes our neighborhoods and city unique and why it is important to preserve these elements.   What a wonderful contribution Mary made to all who are interested in architecture and urban design!”

-Larry Schmidt, director, Beauregard-Keyes House

“Mary was to me one of the finest examples of a woman of professional quality. She was gracious and giving. I wish as other do that she was still here with us. As her son Fletcher said, “we all will carry her with us through our lives.”
-Edgar Chase III, PRC board member
“I had the honor of working with Mary for two years as her deputy editor. It was my first job out of college and I’d never had a real boss before. Mary spoiled me for life. She treated me with kindness, warmth, and generosity well beyond what I deserved. She approached her work with passion and a sense of humor, a rare and important combination, as I’ve come to learn. She was always keen to help me grow and improve as a worker and as a writer, and I learned more than I ever expected over my time with her. I was also touched to see how important a role she played in the community, and how important her work was to people. People would simply materialize at our office to talk about something they’d read in Preservation in Print, and when we published “New Orleans’ Favorite Shotguns” the building was packed with Mary’s devoted fans, none of whom could wait to get a copy. Perhaps what I remember most about working for Mary was how much she cared: about preservation, about the city of New Orleans, and about people. Every time I saw her conduct an interview I was struck by her gravity and honesty, and her ability to listen and to allow people to tell her their stories. I think that’s one of the many reasons everyone loved her so much: with her you always felt listened to and cared about, and she channeled that energy and attention into work that truly enriched the city.
 Mary was a great mentor and a wonderful friend, and I will miss her very much.”
-Alex Lemann, former associate editor, Preservation in Print
“Working with Mary for 18 years was a joy and a privilege. The bright light that burned within her radiated on those around her creating an atmosphere of energy and creativity. Mary not only dreamed up ideas and projects but followed though on seeing them to fruition. The contributions she made not only to the PRC but to the city of New Orleans cannot be measured.Jane Goodall wisely said, “What you do makes a difference and you have to decide what kind of a difference you want to make.” Mary knew what she wanted to do. She loved her family and friends unequivocally. Through her writing she worked to help insure that her beloved historic city would be protected and appreciated.Though we lost Mary way too soon, we’ll never forget what she gave us.”-Jackie Derks, ad manager, Preservation in Print “Mary Fitzpatrick was a tireless advocate for historic preservation in the city of New Orleans, the state of Louisiana and beyond. Her dedicated work as editor of Preservation in Print transformed the magazine into a nationally-renowned outlet for preservation news, and her professionalism and warmth endeared her to her colleagues at the Preservation Resource Center and the State Historic Preservation Office. Mary will be missed, but her legacy as a champion of historic preservation will undoubtedly live on.”
-The staff of the Louisiana State Historic Preservation Office
“Every once in a while Mary and I would head out on a Sunday morning to explore New Orleans’ neighborhoods. Usually we went on bikes, but one of my favorite outings was by car.  It was late in the fall and Mary had just discovered that the PRC didn’t have anything new to market for the holiday season. So she commandeered me to drive her through the Bywater and Marigny while she took photos of houses for a calendar that she had just conceived. We’d turn a corner, Mary would spy a beauty, and out she’d jump to take a picture. Then she’d run down the block, snapping away as one colorful house after another caught her eye. Along the way we stopped for brunch in the Bywater and combed though a secondhand shop. It was quintessential Mary — applying her many talents for the benefit of the PRC, and having so much fun doing it.I admired Mary for so many things: her curiosity, her intellect, her sense of humor, her generosity, her taste. The list goes on, but no string of qualities can quite capture her. I will miss her friendship more than I can say.”
-Janet Howard, president and CEO, Bureau of Governmental Research

“Mary and I started at PRC in 1995 and the first day we met, we instantly became best friends. Here we were, two transplants that fell in love with New Orleans and spent many hours absorbing the charm of our great city — and for our jobs!
Often we’d drive around New Orleans taking pictures of all the good stuff. One day, while driving on Carrollton Avenue, I said “Oh, wait, stop.” She immediately jumped out of the car and took the photo that is on the cover of PRC’s Carrollton neighborhood brochure. Here were two young families, one African American and one white, with a lemonade stand selling delicious hand-squeezed lemonade for $.50 at Palmer Park.

Most of all, as good friends do, we would talk about our families and how much they meant to us. She was always so proud of Vaughan, Fletcher and Welles and loved sharing funny stories.

Mary was the finest, most genuine person I have ever known. She always took the time to listen and reflect because she understood the depth and importance of friendships. She was my go- to-gal for creative ideas and problem-solving. Mary was supportive and encouraging to everyone that knew her. She had an incredible work ethic and oh how she loved ferreting out a story!  Her writing just popped off the page and she will forever be remembered.

I have a book full of memories about Mary and I know all of us will keep her alive in our hearts.”

-Beverly Lamb, development director, PRC 

 

“When shocking, unthinkable things happen, such as Mary’s sudden death, the world becomes profoundly unfathomable to me. I shut down. I can no longer see the pattern in the world, a purpose. In other words, I despair.  
I first met Mary years ago when Stephanie Durant and I were doing the film Interview with the Vampire. Tom Cruise was looking for a comfortable private home to occupy and was hoping it would be the Fitzpatrick’s house. All was on track until Tom’s assistant’s assistant let us know that Tom would be arriving with his exercise trailer in tow and that, yes, it was an ungodly length. Vaughan, Mary’s husband, instructed us to obtain the exact dimensions of the vehicle. He called us to come over.  Mary watched from the window as Vaughan presented us with a pieced together cardboard cutout in the size of Tom Cruise’s exercise trailer. It was splendid. Together we began to maneuver it around the yard checking the would-be turning radius. I caught Mary’s eye in the window. She chuckled. I saw that she immediately understood both the necessity and the absurdity of the exercise and that life alone entertained her.
This memory made me smile. As the days passed after Mary’s death, I sat thinking about Mary. I’ve tried to divine what galactic wave had recently brought me back to her shore and why.
Once, years ago, Mary and my mother, Julie McCollam, had lunch at Galatoires. When they walked in my mother was the despairing, retiring-without-a-replacement editor of the Preservation in Print. When they walked out my mother was the retired editor with a replacement — Mary.  Was this the same?
Mary had approached my mother with a bundle of materials that would become in time Days and Nights in the Dreamy City, asking her to collaborate on it’s creation. My mother reluctantly declined, as other responsibilities in her life needed her attention. She had left the materials on the kitchen counter at her house where I had haphazardly picked them up, read them with growing interest. I murmured, within my mother’s hearing, “I should do this.” Why did I say that? Am I insane? I was already extremely over extended with a full time job and a punishing schedule. But it was too late. My mother was on the phone with Mary making plans to meet so that Mary and I might discuss the book. I looked on incredulous. I shouldn’t have.  My mother and I would discover that Mary shared a ferocious impetus to action.
Meet we did and we talked about everything, everything but the book in fact. We had a wonderful time together laughing, discussing literature, writing, and the world. I recall the wine was a fine vintage that evening and remember thinking how much I plainly liked Mary. I was looking forward to our time together with the book. What?  Good lord — I had already recommitted in my heart and I’d only been at the table for 20 minutes. I was doing the book and I was doing it with Mary — such were the powers of Mary’s oblique persuasion.
I am grateful to this day that Mary believed in me and believed I could do the undoable. When the book came out, colleagues looked at me with astonishment — when did you find time to do this? I don’t know. I still don’t know. All I do know is that with Mary’s support and encouragement, we persevered. Nothing stopped her. I recall very well the day Mary told me that the second and most substantial shipment of the books might be a little late. She continued to say, in her wonderfully flat way, that the ship carrying the books from China had developed mechanical problems once it set to sea. Her eyes grew wide. I said in similar tone, “….so the ship sunk?” She said, “No. Not yet.” — and went on with her business of signing the books we did have. I followed suit. I suspect Mary had a Russian soul.
In the days and weeks to come, I saw a lot of Mary and I loved her. It didn’t take me long to see that everyone loved Mary. She was accomplished, literate, modest, and with a wicked sense of humor that delighted in the foibles of human nature.  She was fully the best of womanhood: a mother, a wife, a career, and a woman with an inner life. She was whole.
As Mary’s son Fletcher so eloquently said at her memorial, we will all carry a piece of Mary with us forever. It’s true. Mary is in my heart. She will remind me of what excellence can be, what humanity can be, what caring can do to make a difference in our world. I think I am beginning again to see a pattern, perhaps a purpose. She set an example for me to persevere despite all circumstance and to do so with humor and without despair.
Mary and I had plans for future books and we were both very excited about the prospect and the fun ahead. I feel saddened that we won’t have those experiences together. I am however honored at the thought of trying to carry out that plan for Mary and for all she did for our community and the great friendship she gave to me and to all of us who knew her. I am so glad that she knew that her last book was well received and that important dollars would flow back to the PRC to support preservation.  
Mary and I were immensely grateful for all of the people that took a moment to send us their “favorite thing” in New Orleans for Days and Nights in the Dreamy City. I have heard that it has changed some people’s notions of what our city is, and for the better. I wish Mary were here so that I could tell her that…”
-Virginia McCollam, co-author, New Orleans: Days and Nights in the Dreamy City

Post your own memories of Mary Fitzpatrick in the comments below. Thank you!

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Neighborhood Conservation Districts Committee
WHEN: Monday, Feb. 3, 2014 at 2:00 PM
WHERE: City Council Chambers (1300 Perdidio Street)

(Pictured: 536-38 Nashville)

If you have an opinion about any of the demolitions, the NCDC members want to hear about it!

CLICK HERE to view to view the agenda and photos. The demolition proposals are listed by neighborhood. Are there any proposals in your area? How do you feel about the demolition?

CLICK HERE to view a map of the proposed demolitions.

CLICK HERE to email the committee and share your thoughts. If this link does not work for you, right click on “click here,” copy the email addresses, and paste the email addresses into the “to” field of an email.

How else can you help? CLICK HERE to learn more about the citizen’s role in the demolition review process.

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In case you haven’t heard, today the Senate passed #S1926, the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act, which delays the dangerous flood insurance hikes that were part of the 2012 Biggert-Waters law. PRC has advocated for this bill and we have been in contact with Sens. Landrieu & Vitter thanking them for their advocacy on the bill. GNO, INC has played a critical leadership role in the advocacy effort and we received support from Preservation Action.
 
NOW the bill will be heard by the House of Representatives. Join us in our advocacy for the Homeowner Insurance Affordability Act by taking action:

Sign up here to become a citizen cosponsor of the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act

We need your help to make sure the House of Representatives acts before flood insurance premiums cause more damage to our communities.  There are already more than 170 cosponsors of H.R. 3370, the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 2013.  We invite you to sign on today as a citizen cosponsor of this legislation so that your voice is heard.  

Join the group of over 170 bipartisan Members of Congress supporting this bill: sign up to become a citizen cosponsor

Flood insurance premium increases have sent shockwaves throughout Louisiana.  We hope you continue to lend your voice as we seek a sustainable, long-term solution that will allow people to buy and sell homes without such extreme premium spikes.

Here is Sen. Mary Landrieu’s statement on Facebook:

“Senate passage of the bipartisan, comprehensive flood insurance reform bill is a significant step forward so people can continue to live where they work to keep producing energy and manufacturing the goods necessary to spur economic growth. 

“Affordable flood insurance is bigger and more important than politics. I am proud that we were able to come together today to protect middle class families and help preserve the American Dream that if you work hard and play by the rules, you can build a prosperous future.”
 
Learn more about the bill in this Times Picayune article HERE.
Categories : Advocacy
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Public Notice NHPA/NEPA Seeking Public Comment for St. Bernard Parish’s Proposal to demolish the residences at 615 – 17 Angela Avenue1 and 6729 Bienvenue Street, Arabi, St. Bernard Parish, LA

St. Bernard Parish has identified 615-17 Angela Ave.2 and 6729 Bienvenue St. as imminent threats to public health and requested FEMA Public Assistance to provide funding for their demolition. These residences are contributing properties to the Old Arabi Historic District listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

FEMA has researched the potential for archaeological resources in each direct project area, and determined that these projects have a low potential to affect archaeological resources.

Federal regulations, 36 CFR Part 800 and 44 CFR Part 10, require FEMA, as a funding agency, to identify if any of the properties affected by the project are listed or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places; to assess the effects the project will have on historic properties; and to seek ways to avoid, minimize, or mitigate any adverse effects to historic properties; and to evaluate the proposed action’s potential for significant impacts to the human and natural environment.3

To help develop a course of action for this project, FEMA is requesting input by January 27, 2014 from any member of the public on ways to avoid demolition or mitigate adverse effects to this historic building or other significant elements of the human and natural environment.

 

 

Comments can be posted HERE.

Or mailed to:
FEMA Mail Center/Historic Preservation
1 Seine Court,
New Orleans, LA 70114

All comments must be posted or postmarked by January 27, 2014


1 Angela Avenue is also labeled as Angela Street on several references including SHPO’s NRHP database HERE and Google maps. FEMA determined to use the name, Angela Avenue, as it is the name provided by the Applicant.

2 The high winds and heavy rains of Hurricanes Katrina and the subsequent widespread flooding damaged many buildings in Orleans Parish, LA. In the aftermath of the hurricane, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is issuing this public notice as part of its responsibilities under the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation’s regulations, 36 CFR Part 800, implementing Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (NHPA). This notice applies to activities carried out by the Public Assistance (PA) program implemented under the authority of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C.§§5152-5206.

3 FEMA is required to follow the Council of Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (NEPA regulations, 43 FR 55978 [1978]) that provide policy and procedures to enable FEMA officials to be informed of and take into account environmental considerations when authorizing or approving major FEMA actions that may significantly affect the environment of the United States. It is the intent of NEPA that federal agencies encourage and facilitate public involvement to the extent practicable in decisions that may affect the quality of the environment. More information on NEPA and FEMA’s Alternative Arrangements process can be found on FEMA’s web page HERE.

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Our mission: to promote the preservation, restoration and revitalization of the historic neighborhoods and architecture of New Orleans.